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Locks


Instead of giving a politician the keys to the city, it might be better to change the locks.   Doug Larson

Doug Larson (February 10, 1926 to April 1, 2017[1]) was a columnist and editor for the Door County Advocate (1953–1964) and wrote a daily column, “Doug’s Dugout, for the Green Bay Press-Gazette (1964–1988),[3] both Wisconsin-based newspapers. The column was originally syndicated through United Media under the title “Senator Soaper Says”; Larson took over authorship in 1980.[4] Previously, it had been written by Bill Vaughn of the Kansas City Star.[5] Larson was born in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.

 

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Colors


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The sound of colors is so definite that it would be hard to find anyone who would express bright yellow with base notes, or dark lake with the treble.   Wassily Kandinsky

Wassily Wassilyevich Kandinsky (16 December [O.S. 4 December] 1866 – 13 December 1944) was a Russian painter and art theorist. Kandinsky is generally credited as the pioneer of abstract art.

 

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Search

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Search others for their virtue, and yourself for your vices.   R. Buckminster Fuller

Richard Buckminster Fuller ( July 12, 1895 – July 1, 1983)[1] was an American architect, systems theorist, author, designer, inventor and futurist. Fuller published more than 30 books, coining or popularizing terms such as “Spaceship Earth“, “Dymaxion” house/car, ephemeralization, synergetic, and “tensegrity“. He also developed numerous inventions, mainly architectural designs, and popularized the widely known geodesic dome. Carbon molecules known as fullerenes were later named by scientists for their structural and mathematical resemblance to geodesic spheres.

 

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Refinement

The furnace of affliction produces refinement, in states as well as individuals.   John Adams

John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was an American statesman, attorney, diplomat, writer, and Founding Father who served as the second president of the United States from 1797 to 1801.

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Productive

Times of great calamity and confusion have been productive for the greatest minds. The purest ore is produced from the hottest furnace. The brightest thunder-bolt is elicited from the darkest storm.   Charles Caleb Colton

Charles Caleb Colton (1780–1832) was an English cleric, writer and collector, well known for his eccentricities.

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Restful

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What makes a river so restful to people is that it doesn’t have any doubt – it is sure to get where it is going, and it doesn’t want to go anywhere else.   Hal Boyle

Harold Vincent “Hal” Boyle (July 24, 1911 – April 1, 1974) was a prolific, Pulitzer-prize-winning journalist for the Associated Press. During 30 years with the AP Boyle wrote 7,680 columns.[1] He is best known for his work as a war correspondent during World War II. He was consistently closer to the front lines in the European and Pacific theatres of operation than other correspondents.[2] His column became a staple in over 700 newspapers.[1] He is also the namesake of a prize given annually to reporters by the Oversees Press Club of America, for the best newspaper or wire service reporting from abroad.

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