Posted in Quotes

Home

A house is not a home unless it contains food and fire for the mind as well as the body.   Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin(January 17, 1706 [O.S. January 6, 1705] – April 17, 1790) was an American polymath and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. Franklin was a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, freemason, postmaster, scientist, inventor, humorist, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American Enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. As an inventor, he is known for the lightning rodbifocals, and the Franklin stove, among other inventions.  He founded many civic organizations, including Philadelphia’s fire department and the University of Pennsylvania.

 

 

Posted in Quotes

Interested

james_gandolfini

I’m an actor… I do a job and I go home. Why are you interested in me? You don’t ask a truck driver about his job.   James Gandolfini

James Joseph Gandolfini Jr. (September 18, 1961 – June 19, 2013) was an American actor and producer. He was best known for his role as Tony Soprano, an Italian-Americancrime boss, in the HBO crime drama The Sopranos. He garnered enormous praise for his performance, winning three Emmy Awards, three Screen Actors Guild Awards, and one Golden Globe Award.

 

james-gandolfini-hbo

Posted in Quotes

Television

Hitchcock,Alfred

Television has brought back murder into the home – where it belongs.  Alfred Hitchcock

Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock, KBE (13 August 1899 – 29 April 1980) was an English film director and producer. Often nicknamed “The Master of Suspense”, he pioneered many elements of the suspense andpsychological thriller genres. After a successful career in British cinema with both silent films and early talkies, renowned as England’s best director, Hitchcock moved to Hollywood in 1939 and became a US citizen in 1955.

alfred-hitchcock

 

Posted in Quotes

Comfort

edithsitwell

Winter is the time for comfort, for good food and warmth, for the touch of a friendly hand and for a talk beside the fire: it is the time for home.
Edith Sitwell

Dame Edith Louisa Sitwell DBE (7 September 1887 – 9 December 1964) was a British poet and critic and the eldest of the three literary Sitwells.  Like her brothers Osbert and Sacheverell, Edith reacted badly to her eccentric, unloving parents, and lived for much of her life with her governess. She never married, but became passionately attached to the homosexual Russian painter Pavel Tchelitchew, and her home was always open to London’s poetic circle, to whom she was unfailingly generous and helpful.  Sitwell published poetry continuously from 1913, some of it abstract and set to music. With her dramatic style and exotic costumes, sometimes she was labelled a poseur, but consistently, her work was praised for its solid technique and painstaking craftsmanship.

by Photo Press, bromide print, 1928
by Photo Press, bromide print, 1928

 

 

Posted in Movie Speeches

Redemption – Speech

tom hanks

From the movie Saving Private Ryan, the speech is delivered by the incredible Tom Hanks.

Captain Miller: Mike? What’s the pool on me up to right now? What’s it up to? What is it three hundred dollars — is that it? Three hundred? I’m a school teacher. I teach English Composition in this little town called Addley, Pennsylvania. The last eleven years, I’ve been at Thomas Alva Edison High School. I was coach of the baseball team in the spring time.
Back home when I tell people what I do for a living, they think, well, that, that figures. But over here its a big, a big mystery. So I guess I’ve changed some. Sometimes I wonder if I’ve changed so much my wife is even gonna to recognize me whenever it is I get back to her — and how I’ll ever be able to tell her about days like today.
Ryan — I don’t know anything about Ryan. I don’t care. Man means nothin’ to me. It’s just a name. But if — you know — if going to Ramel and finding him so he can go home, if that earns me the right to get back to my wife — well, then, then that’s my mission.
You wanna leave? You wanna go off and fight the war? Alright. Alright, I won’t stop you. I’ll even put in the paperwork. I just know that every man I kill the farther away from home I feel.

Opening with the Allied invasion of Normandy on 6 June 1944, members of the 2nd Ranger Battalion under Cpt. Miller fight ashore to secure a beachhead. Amidst the fighting, two brothers are killed in action. Earlier in New Guinea, a third brother is KIA. Their mother, Mrs. Ryan, is to receive all three of the grave telegrams on the same day. The United States Army Chief of Staff, George C. Marshall, is given an opportunity to alleviate some of her grief when he learns of a fourth brother, Private James Ryan, and decides to send out 8 men (Cpt. Miller and select members from 2nd Rangers) to find him and bring him back home to his mother

The Youtube Clip.

Capt. Miller and the man he came to save Private Ryan. tomhanksandmattdamontomandmatt

Posted in Movie Speeches

Value – Speech

jeff danielschamberlinjoshuachamberlain

From the movie Gettysburg, based on the book The Killer Angels.

Commander of the 20th Maine,Joshua Chamberlain played by Jeff Daniels

Chamberlain: This regiment was formed last summer in Maine. There were a thousand of us then. There are less than three hundred of us now. All of us volunteered to fight for the union, just as you did. Some came mainly because we were bored at home — thought this looked like it might be fun. Some came because we were ashamed not to. Many of us came because it was the right thing to do. And all of us have seen men die.
This is a different kind of army. If you look back through history, you will see men fighting for pay, for women, for some other kind of loot. They fight for land, power, because a king leads them or — or just because they like killing. But we are here for something new. This has not happened much in the history of the world. We are an army out to set other men free.
America should be free ground — all of it. Not divided by a line between slave state and free — all the way, from here to the Pacific Ocean. No man has to bow. No man born to royalty. Here, we judge you by what you do, not by who your father was. Here, you can be something. Here, is the place to build a home.
But it’s not the land. There’s always more land.
It’s the idea that we all have value — you and me.
What we’re fighting for, in the end, we’re fighting for each other.
Sorry, I didn’t mean to preach. You, you go ahead. You talk for awhile. If you — If you choose to join us, you want your muskets back, you can have ’em. Nothing more will be said by anybody anywhere. If you choose not to join us, well you can come along under guard, and when this is all over I will do what I can to see you get a fair treatment. But for now, we’re moving out.
Gentlemen, I think if we lose this fight, we lose the war. So if you choose to join us, I’ll be personally very grateful.

The Youtube Clip.

Gettysburg one of my favorite places to visit.

Posted in Quotes

Rough

300px-Nessmuk_1873_b

We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home, in towns and cities. G.W. Sears

From Wikipedia: George Washington Sears (December 2, 1821 – May 1, 1890) was a sportswriter for Forest and Stream magazine in the 1880s and an early conservationist. His stories, appearing under the pen name, “Nessmuk” popularized self-guided canoe camping tours of the Adirondack lakes in open, lightweight solo canoes and what is today called ultralight camping.

And lived and died in my home state of PA. Neat guy.

220px-Nessmuk_(George_Washington_Sears)

And from his book of Poetry: Forrest Runes

OCTOBER

By a Still-Hunter

THERE comes a month in the weary year,
A month of leisure and peaceful rest,
When the ripe leaves fall and the air is clear—
October, the brown, the crisp, the blest.

My lot has little enough of bliss;
I drag the days of the odd eleven—
Counting the time that shall lead to this,
The month that opens the hunter’s heaven.

And oh, for the mornings crisp and white,
With the sweep of the hounds upon the track:
The bark-roofed cabins, the camp-fire’s light,
The break of the deer and the rifle’s crack.

Do you call this trifling? I tell you, friend,
A life in the forest is past all praise.
Give me a dozen such months on end—
You may take my balance of years and days.

For brick and mortar breed filth and crime,
And a pulse of evil that throbs and beats.
And men are withered before their prime
By the curse paved in with the lanes and streets.

And lungs are poisoned, and shoulders bowed,
In the smothering reek of mill and mine;
And death stalks in on the struggling crowd—
But he shuns the shadow of oak and pine.

And of all to which the memory clings,
There is naught so dear as the sunny spots
Where our shanties stood by the crystal springs,
The vanished hounds and the lucky shots.