Posted in Movie Speeches

Breaker Morant – Speech

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Breaker Morant is a 1980 Australian war– and trial film directed by Bruce Beresford, who also co-wrote based on Kenneth G. Ross‘ 1978 play of the same name.

The film centres around the 1902 court martial of Lieutenants Harry Morant, Peter Handcock, and George Witton – one of the first war crimes prosecutions in British military history. Australians serving in the British Army during the Second Anglo-Boer War, Lts. Morant, Handcock, and Witton stood accused of murdering captured enemy combatants and an unarmed civilian in the Northern Transvaal. The film is notable for its exploration of the Nuremberg Defense, the politics of the death penalty, and the human cost of total war. As the trial unfolds, the events in question are shown in flashbacks.

 

 

What follows is the complete text of the closing argument delivered by Major J. F. Thomas on behalf of Lieutenants Morant, Handcock, and Wilton in the court martial portrayed in Breaker Morant:

The main fact of this case–that the Boer prisoners were executed–has never been denied by the defense. However, I feel that there is no evidence at all for bringing charges against Lieutenant Wilton, a junior officer who had no reason to question the instructions of his superiors and whose only “crime” was that he shot a Boer in self-defense.

And further, no one denies the admirable fighting qualities of the Boers, nor, in general, their sense of honor. However, those Boers fighting in the northern Transvaal, in commando groups, are outlaws, renegades, often without any recognized form of control, addicted to the wrecking of trains, the looting of farms. Lord Kitchener himself recognized the unorthodox nature of this warfare when he formed a special squad to deal with it–the Bushveldt Carbineers.

Now when the rules and customs of war are departed from by one side, one must expect the same sort of behavior from the other. Accordingly, officers of the Carbineers should be, and up until now have been, given the widest possible discretion in their treatment of the enemy. Now, I don’t ask for proclamations condoning distasteful methods of war, but I do say that we must take for granted that it does happen.

Let’s not give our officers hazy, vague instructions about what they may and may not do. Let’s not reprimand on the one hand for hampering the column with prisoners and at another time and another place haul them up as murderers for obeying orders.

Lieutenant Morant shot no prisoners before the death of Captain Hunt. He then changed a good deal and adopted the sternest possible measures against the enemy. Yet there is no evidence to suggest that Lieutenant Morant has an intrinsically barbarous nature. On the contrary. The fact of the matter is that war changes men’s natures. The barbarities of war are seldom committed by abnormal men. The tragedy of war is that these horrors are committed by normal men in abnormal situations, situations in which the ebb and flow of everyday life have departed and have been replaced by a constant round of fear and anger, blood and death.

Soldiers at war are not to be judged by civilian rules, as the prosecution is attempting to do, even though they commit acts which, calmly viewed afterwards could only be seen as unchristian and brutal. And if, in every war, particularly guerrilla war, all the men who committed reprisals were to be charged and tried as murderers, court martials like this one would be in permanent session, would they not?

I say that we cannot hope to judge such matters unless we ourselves have been submitted to the same pressures, the same provocations, as these men whose actions are on trial.

 

 

Great movie, I had never heard of it before I listened to a podcast The Dangerous History Podcast.   Great movie and it can be watched in its entirety on Youtube.

 

Posted in Movie Speeches

Selling Fear- Speech

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Professor Ned Brainard’s, (Fred MacMurray) discovery of flubber hasn’t quite brought him – or his college – the riches he thought. The Pentagon has declared his discovery to be top secret and the IRS has slapped him with a huge tax bill, even if he has yet to receive a cent. He thinks he may have found the solution in the form of flubbergas, which can change the weather. It also helps Medfield College’s football team to win a game. At home, his wife Betsy is jealous of the attention lavished on him by an old high school girlfriend.

Professor Ned BrainardWell, it seems to me that a lot of people are going around these days selling fear.   All kinds of fear.  Fear of bombs, bugs, smog, surpluses, fallout, falling hair, even fear of Mr. Hawk.
We find ourselves apologizing, Hiding our heads, or jumping at shadows.
I can remember when groundhog day only came once a year in this country.
Now, I see a lot of students from my science class here in the courtroom. They may not be the most studious
group of young people in college today, But Ill say this for them:
so far they are unafraid. 
They have good will, enthusiasm, and an infinite capacity for making mistakes.
I have high hopes for them.

Prosecutor:  Am I to understand,  professor,You actually encourage mistakes in your class?

Professor Ned Brainard: Mr. Prosecutor, the road to genius is paved with fumble-Footing and bumbling.  Anyone who falls flat on his
face is at least moving in the right direction:  forward.
And the fellow who makes the most mistakes…
may be the one who will save the neck of the whole world someday.

This speech is at 1:27:00 mark in the movie.

A Disney movie with a Court Scene. 

In 1961 when he took his family to Disneyland, a woman came up to him and asked “Are you Fred MacMurray?”, and when he answered he was, she hit him with her purse and told him she had taken her children to see him in “The Apartment” and was furious because “That was not a Disney movie”, he responded, “No ma’am, it wasn’t.” He then turned to his wife and announced he was done playing bad guys in movies.

 

 

Posted in Movie Speeches

Right and Wrong – Speech

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John Wayne playing Davy Crockett before the Battle at the Alamo.

From IMDB:  A small band of soldiers sacrifice their lives in hopeless combat against a massive army in order to prevent a tyrant from smashing the new Republic of Texas.

Davy Crockett: It was like I was empty. Well, I’m not empty anymore. That’s what’s important, to feel useful in this old world, to hit a lick against what’s wrong for what’s right even though you get walloped for saying that word. Now I may sound like a Bible beater yelling up a revival at a river crossing camp meeting, but that don’t change the truth none. There’s right and there’s wrong. You got to do one or the other. You do the one and you’re living. You do the other and you may be walking around, but you’re dead as a beaver hat.

A little echo of Julius Caesar, Act 2, Scene 2.

Cowards die many times before their deaths.
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear,
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.
Johnwayne-director
John Wayne also directed the movie.
Posted in Movie Speeches

Summary – Speech

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The Lost World:  Jurassic Park     Four years after the failure of Jurassic Park on Isla Nublar, John Hammond reveals to Ian Malcolm that there was another island (“Site B”) on which dinosaurs were bred before being transported to Isla Nublar. Left alone since the disaster, the dinosaurs have flourished, and Hammond is anxious that the world see them in their “natural” environment before they are exploited.

Probably the shortest and  best summary of an entire situation in one sentence.

Dr. Ian Malcolm: Oh, yeah. Oooh, ahhh, that’s how it always starts. Then later there’s running and um, screaming.

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Dr. Ian Malcom Knows Of What He Speaks

 

 

Posted in Movie Speeches

NSA – Speech

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Another great speech from Good Will Hunting.

Will: Why shouldn’t I work for the N.S.A.? That’s a tough one, but I’ll take a shot. Say I’m working at N.S.A. Somebody puts a code on my desk, something nobody else can break. Maybe I take a shot at it and maybe I break it. And I’m real happy with myself, ’cause I did my job well. But maybe that code was the location of some rebel army in North Africa or the Middle East. Once they have that location, they bomb the village where the rebels were hiding and fifteen hundred people I never met, never had no problem with, get killed. Now the politicians are sayin’, “Oh, send in the Marines to secure the area” ’cause they don’t give a shit. It won’t be their kid over there, gettin’ shot. Just like it wasn’t them when their number got called, ’cause they were pullin’ a tour in the National Guard. It’ll be some kid from Southie takin’ shrapnel in the ass. And he comes back to find that the plant he used to work at got exported to the country he just got back from. And the guy who put the shrapnel in his ass got his old job, ’cause he’ll work for fifteen cents a day and no bathroom breaks. Meanwhile, he realizes the only reason he was over there in the first place was so we could install a government that would sell us oil at a good price. And, of course, the oil companies used the skirmish over there to scare up domestic oil prices. A cute little ancillary benefit for them, but it ain’t helping my buddy at two-fifty a gallon. And they’re takin’ their sweet time bringin’ the oil back, of course, and maybe even took the liberty of hiring an alcoholic skipper who likes to drink martinis and fuckin’ play slalom with the icebergs, and it ain’t too long ’til he hits one, spills the oil and kills all the sea life in the North Atlantic. So now my buddy’s out of work and he can’t afford to drive, so he’s got to walk to the fuckin’ job interviews, which sucks ’cause the shrapnel in his ass is givin’ him chronic hemorrhoids. And meanwhile he’s starvin’, ’cause every time he tries to get a bite to eat, the only blue plate special they’re servin’ is North Atlantic scrod with Quaker State. So what did I think? I’m holdin’ out for somethin’ better. I figure fuck it, while I’m at it why not just shoot my buddy, take his job, give it to his sworn enemy, hike up gas prices, bomb a village, club a baby seal, hit the hash pipe and join the National Guard? I could be elected president.

 

Great movie made up of so many fantastic speeches, which made up fantastic scenes, which made real by great actors.   

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From Kevin Smith’s Dogma

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Movie Speeches

Hatchet – Speech

Uncle Buck Hatchet

A great preemptive scary speech from a male relative to a less than desirable male who is dating his niece.

Buck: Fair enough. I like to carry it, you never know when you’re going to need it. A situation may come up say for example, someone has been drinking, and about to drive a loved one home… then I’d like to know I have it. Not to kill, no. Just to maim. Take a little off the shoulder. Swish! The elbow. Slash! Shave a little meat off the old kneecap. Fowap! Ooooo! You got both kneecaps? I like to keep mine razor sharp. Sharp enough you can shave with it. Why I’ve been known to circumcise a gnat. You’re not a gnat are you, Bug? Wait a minute, bug, gnat. Is there a little similarity? Whoa, I think there is! Ha ha ha. You understand what I’m talking about? I don’t think you do. I’ll be right back. Heh heh heh heh.

John Candy you left us way too soon.   Same with the great director John Hughes who made this film.

Uncle Buck

Posted in Movie Speeches

NVA – Speech

 

Hamburger Hill

Hamburger Hill a 1987 movie with a big role played by Dylan McDermott.

From IMDB:  A brutal and realistic war film focuses on the lives of a squad of 14 U.S. Army soldiers of B Company, 3rd Battalion, 187th Infanty Regiment, 101st Airborne Division during the brutal 10 day (May 11-20, 1969) battle for Hill 937 in the A Shau Valley of Vietnam as they try again and again to take the fortified hill held by the North Vietnamese, and the faults and casualties they take every time in which the battle was later dubbed “Hamburger Hill” because enemy fire was so fierce that the fusillade of bullets turned assaulting troops into shreded hamburger meat.

 

Sgt. Frantz: All right, listen up. You people will not die on me in combat. You fucking new guys will do everything you can to prove me wrong. You’ll walk on trails, kick cans, sleep on guard, smoke dope and diddely-bop through the bush like you were back on the block. Or on guard at night you’ll write letters, play with your organ, and think of your girl back home. Forget her. Right now, some hair head has her on her back and is telling her to fuck for peace. This is Han. Those of you who are foolish will think of him as ‘gook,’ ‘slope,’ ‘slant’ or ‘dink.’ He is your enemy. He came over on the Chieu Hoi programme, and after he fattens himself on C-rations he will be hunting your young asses in the Ashau Valley. Now forget about this Viet Cong shit. What you’ll encounter out there is hard core NVA, North Vietnamese. Highly motivated, highly trained and well equipped. If you meet Han or his cousins, you will give him respect and refer to those little bastards as ‘Nathanial Victor.’ Meet him twice, and survive, and you will refer to him as ‘MISTER Nathanial Victor.’ Now people, I am sick and tired of filling body bags with your dumb fucking mistakes.

 Han is closing in on your position. It’s night… Look at me! I’m gonna save your life and your gonna save mine. It’s night, it’s raining. While your thinking about peace, love and whether or not we should be in Vietnam, Han is going to cut your fucking throat. And your sleeping. You’ve been humping the boonies for months. It’s your turn to sleep, you’re allowed to sleep. What do you think Han is going to do? Is he going to wake you up, Alphabet? And smile? And talk about women? Mister Nathanial Victor gets his rocks off watching you die. Some of you think you have problems because you’re against the war. You demonstrated in school… you wear peace symbols on your steel, and you have attitudes. I’m orphan, my brother’s queer, the city of Chicago got the clap from my sister, Mom drinks, Dad coughs blood, I have ringworm, imersion foot, the incurable crud and the draft ruined my chances of being a brain surgeon. People, you are in Vietnam. You have no problems. Except me.

And him.

A scene similar to this in the mini-series The Pacific, Jap- Speech.   Warriors truly respect their enemies.

Near the end of the film, there is a scene where a soldier, his face covered with bandages, is blindly reaching out to his comrades as they hurry past him. This is taken from a famous picture taken at the real Hamburger Hill.