Posted in Movie Speeches

NVA – Speech

 

Hamburger Hill

Hamburger Hill a 1987 movie with a big role played by Dylan McDermott.

From IMDB:  A brutal and realistic war film focuses on the lives of a squad of 14 U.S. Army soldiers of B Company, 3rd Battalion, 187th Infanty Regiment, 101st Airborne Division during the brutal 10 day (May 11-20, 1969) battle for Hill 937 in the A Shau Valley of Vietnam as they try again and again to take the fortified hill held by the North Vietnamese, and the faults and casualties they take every time in which the battle was later dubbed “Hamburger Hill” because enemy fire was so fierce that the fusillade of bullets turned assaulting troops into shreded hamburger meat.

 

Sgt. Frantz: All right, listen up. You people will not die on me in combat. You fucking new guys will do everything you can to prove me wrong. You’ll walk on trails, kick cans, sleep on guard, smoke dope and diddely-bop through the bush like you were back on the block. Or on guard at night you’ll write letters, play with your organ, and think of your girl back home. Forget her. Right now, some hair head has her on her back and is telling her to fuck for peace. This is Han. Those of you who are foolish will think of him as ‘gook,’ ‘slope,’ ‘slant’ or ‘dink.’ He is your enemy. He came over on the Chieu Hoi programme, and after he fattens himself on C-rations he will be hunting your young asses in the Ashau Valley. Now forget about this Viet Cong shit. What you’ll encounter out there is hard core NVA, North Vietnamese. Highly motivated, highly trained and well equipped. If you meet Han or his cousins, you will give him respect and refer to those little bastards as ‘Nathanial Victor.’ Meet him twice, and survive, and you will refer to him as ‘MISTER Nathanial Victor.’ Now people, I am sick and tired of filling body bags with your dumb fucking mistakes.

 Han is closing in on your position. It’s night… Look at me! I’m gonna save your life and your gonna save mine. It’s night, it’s raining. While your thinking about peace, love and whether or not we should be in Vietnam, Han is going to cut your fucking throat. And your sleeping. You’ve been humping the boonies for months. It’s your turn to sleep, you’re allowed to sleep. What do you think Han is going to do? Is he going to wake you up, Alphabet? And smile? And talk about women? Mister Nathanial Victor gets his rocks off watching you die. Some of you think you have problems because you’re against the war. You demonstrated in school… you wear peace symbols on your steel, and you have attitudes. I’m orphan, my brother’s queer, the city of Chicago got the clap from my sister, Mom drinks, Dad coughs blood, I have ringworm, imersion foot, the incurable crud and the draft ruined my chances of being a brain surgeon. People, you are in Vietnam. You have no problems. Except me.

And him.

A scene similar to this in the mini-series The Pacific, Jap- Speech.   Warriors truly respect their enemies.

Near the end of the film, there is a scene where a soldier, his face covered with bandages, is blindly reaching out to his comrades as they hurry past him. This is taken from a famous picture taken at the real Hamburger Hill.

 

Posted in Movie Speeches

Vow- Speech

mel gibson From IMDB: We Were Soldiers In a place soon to be known as The Valley of Death, in a football field-sized clearing called landing zone X-Ray, Lt. Colonel Hal Moore and 400 young troopers from the elite newly formed American 7th “Air” Cavalry, were surrounded by 2,000 North Vietnamese soldiers dug into the tunnel warren mountainside. The ensuing battle was one of the most savage in U.S. history and is portrayed here as the signal encounter between the American and North Vietnamese armies. We Were Soldiers Once… And Young is a tribute to the nobility of those men under fire, their common acts of uncommon valor, and their loyalty to and love for one another.

Look around you. In the 7th Cavalry, we got a Captain from the Ukraine. Another from Puerto Rico. We’ve got Japanese, Chinese, Blacks, Hispanics, Cherokee Indians, Jews and Gentiles – all Americans. Now here in the States, some men in this unit may experience discrimination because of race or creed. But for you and me now, all that is gone. We’re moving into the valley of the shadow of death, where you will watch the back of the man next to you, as he will watch yours. And you won’t care what color he is or by what name he calls God. They say we’re leavin’ home. We’re goin’ to what home was always supposed to be. So let us understand the situation. We are goin’ into battle against a tough and determined enemy. I can’t promise you that I will bring you all home alive. But this I swear before you and before Almighty God that when we go into battle, I will be the first to set foot on the field, and I will be the last to step off. And I will leave no one behind. Dead or alive, we will all come home together. So help me God. Lt. Col HAL MOORE played by Mel Gibson.

The story was originally written, We Were Soldiers Once … and Young, by the man who lived it, now retired Lt. General Harold G. Moore. While serving as an instructor at West Point, Moore taught then-cadet Norman Schwarzkopf. The book of course goes into full details of the battle and the true extent of it.

halmoore_mic

If you have the inclination to read the book and see the movie I suggest seeing the movie first then reading the book. You will disappointed in the movie and some of its portrayal of events otherwise.

A little Hollywood boomerang action: From the movie Lethal Weapon (1987) Murtaugh tells Riggs(Mel Gibson) that Huntsaker saved his life in the Ia Drang Valley in 1965. Mel Gibson would later play Col. Hal Moore in We Were Soldiers (2002) which is a movie adaptation of that battle.